The Girl Who Saved Christmas by Matt Haig | Book Review

The Girl Who Saved Christmas is the second book in Matt Haig’s Christmas trilogy and the second book out of the three I will be reviewing this holiday season. The story follows Amelia Wishart, the first child ever to receive a Christmas gift. Although the gifts were delivered by Father Christmas (and they still are), … Continue reading The Girl Who Saved Christmas by Matt Haig | Book Review

Mourning and Melancholy in E.A. Poe’s The Raven | An Essay

Edgar Allen Poe’s poem The Raven is fraught with themes of the tortured soul, the deranged mind and representations of mourning and melancholy that are brought upon by the death of his beloved lady, becoming one of the greatest poems of the Dark Romanticism. In the 19th century Romanticism not only cantered its idea on … Continue reading Mourning and Melancholy in E.A. Poe’s The Raven | An Essay

October, October by Katya Balen | Book Review

Autumn is my favourite season and October, October by Katya Balen comprises everything I love about it. Before properly getting into the review I have to confess I’ve looked for the roots of this passion I have for autumn, specifically for October. Thankfully there is such a thing as a reverse due date calculator, which … Continue reading October, October by Katya Balen | Book Review

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov: Value of Privacy and the American Consumer Culture | An Essay

Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita is a myth in popular culture that uniquely shines through its approach of sensitive subjects such as paedophilia, and, maybe most importantly, through Humbert Humbert’s criticism and irony regarding post-war America and the illusory characteristics of commodities specific to the American consumer culture. Seemingly being a work of erotic and vulgar themes, … Continue reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov: Value of Privacy and the American Consumer Culture | An Essay

Normal People by Sally Rooney | Book Review

Normal People by Sally Rooney made me feel miserable. I didn’t begin by loving the novel, not even by liking it; I initially found the profoundly depressing story of Connell and Marianne rather annoying and monotonous. Fifty pages in I realised how downhearted this sorrowful depiction of reality made me feel, and, although I might … Continue reading Normal People by Sally Rooney | Book Review

The Cure by Patricia Josephine | Book Review

Patricia Josephine, an enormously underappreciated author who I’ve been friends with for more than five years, sent me her upcoming novel, The Cure, to review it, for which I am very grateful. If you have been reading my blog, you probably know that I’ve already reviewed quite a few of her literary works - and … Continue reading The Cure by Patricia Josephine | Book Review